Thought-Controlled Bionic Leg
science
Developed at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago (RIC), the groundbreaking bionic limb decodes neural signals from redirected nerves.
—InHabitat
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Restoring Pride
technology
In the Soviet era, Russian science was lavished with money and resources. But post-communism, innovation has slumped. Can a new tech city reverse its fortunes?
—BBC
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Passion Projects Changing World
culture
Sometimes businesses can make change themselves, but sometimes it just takes a business leader devoting a little time to make a difference.
—FAST CO
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Improve dental care in Nepal
health
Alden says it wasn’t until recently that he truly came to understand the scope of Spero’s humanitarian ambitions.
—Washington Post
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Harvesting Fog
technology
A fog-harvesting system that is up to five times more efficient than previous systems at turning airborne water into drinking water has been developed by researchers at MIT.
—Wired.UK
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Helping Put Food On The Table
technology
Without electricity to power freezers, food leftovers aren't really an option in most of India. A 26-year-old grad student had developed a low-cost technology that can prevent tons of food waste.
—Fast Company
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Food Sharing Communities
environment
Now a home-cooked meal and a pancake brunch in Barcelona or a North African dinner in Brooklyn is just a click away.
—GOOD
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Dancing Arches : A Welcoming Place
art & design
The City of Lancaster is committed to the arts and their strategic plan includes public art projects to be incorporated into all parks, streetscapes, and public spaces.
—GOOD
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Defibrilators by Drone
science
A German technology non-profit has put together an autonomous octocopter that can carry a defibrillator, aiming to get to patients faster than an ambulance.
—WIRED
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Rid World Of Deadly Bacteria
environment
Scientists are using steam generated by the sun as a way to sanitize things in places where unclean conditions often lead to disease and death
—Co.Exist
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World-Changing Inventions
art & design
Glass is crushed and a binding agent added to create strong materials in various shapes.
—Popular Science
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Algae to Fuel
technology
Florida-native Evie Sobczak is hard at work in her garage developing a device that turns algae into fuel.
—inhabitat
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Lighting & Creativity
environment
New German research finds a darkened room encourages freedom of thought and inspires innovation.
—Pacific*Standard
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Breathing Buildings on the Horizon
architecture
Using striking technical breakthroughs, designers are moving closer to making lightweight buildings that can move, think and feel.
—BBC
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Son Gave Kidney to Save Father
culture
This Father's Day, a son and his dad have a very special reason to celebrate. After struggling with kidney failure for a year, doctors told Frank Furia, 56, that his son, Tyler, 21, was a perfect match.
—NBC News
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Giving Sight to the Blind
technology
Researchers in Isreal are in the process of developing contact lenses that send electrical signals to the brain, and are then interpreted as images. This should allow the blind to see.
—The Economist
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Everyone's A Winner
culture
High school sophomore Brendan Murphy sent every athlete at the Hudson Valley Special Olympics Spring Games home with a trophy and a smile this year.
—HooplaHa
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Improving Global Food Security
technology
The finalists in the Thought for Food Challenge have some helpful ideas on how we’re going to feed everyone in the world, from reclaiming land to building vertical farms.
—CO.EXIST
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Creating Meaning
culture
The founders of online retailer Madesmith are betting that hearing other people’s stories will make you want to buy their handmade goods.
—CO.EXIST
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Urban Farming Helps
urban
In front yards, backyards and on vacant land where nothing but weeds and debris used to be, an urban farm belt is forming, where just a few years ago, no one would come outside.
—Detroit Free Press
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10Things I've Learned
self
My students spent about an hour to an hour and a half a day designing cardboard arcade games and . . . the results were mixed.
—Education Rethink
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Learn from 8th graders
culture
Essentially, they “taught” me how to teach them better through the interaction and feedback we gave to each other.
—PLP
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Circuits kill bacteria
science
Remote-controlled, dissolvable electronic implants have been created that could help attack microbes, provide pain relief and stimulate bone growth.
—BBC
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Fix African Farms
technology
Africa could help feed the world if its farmland was properly utilised. Things are starting to change, however, thanks to ideas transforming farmers’ lives.
—BBC
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Bugs Eat Plastic
science
Humans use something like 500 billion plastic bags a year. A few are re-used, but most are just thrown away.
—BBC
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Training Honeybees
technology
Mines dot the landscape and still kill. A new animal is being trained to locate them: honeybees.
—Neatorama
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New Generation: Philanthropists
culture
At many top business schools, students are integrating the practice of philanthropy into education early on.
—Business Insider
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Better Community Health
urban
Ron Finley plants vegetable gardens in South Central LA — in abandoned lots, traffic medians, along the curbs.
—npr
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First In 400 Years
science
There is a long way to go before cranes become widespread again, but it is absolutely momentous to see this egg laid at Slimbridge.
—BBC
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A Caring Robot?
technology
Whether they be nursing homes, geriatric hospitals or hospices, all seem to suffer a dire shortage of nursing staff.
—The Economist
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For a fellow student
art & design
So two students built a robotic locker for a fellow student
—GOOD
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Birth by cellphone light?
technology
On this evening, the midwife shows me the only light available. She pulls her cell phone out of her pocket and shines a dim blue light in my direction
—GOOD
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What makes us human?
self
Chimps are hierarchical with an alpha chimp getting priority in feeding. One experiment set a high-ranking chimp against a low-ranking one to compete for food.
—NAUTILUS
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Harvard develops tiniest robot
technology
Scientists at Harvard University have developed tiny winged robots that mimic insects in nature.
—The Globe & Mail
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Instruments from gargage
culture
The idea for the orchestra first came about after Chávez brought a youth orchestra from the neighboring town of Carapeguá
—Mother Jones
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Patagonia's Venture Fund
global
The clothing giant recently decided to launch an internal venture fund, called $20 Million & Change
—Fast Company
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Soaring High In Nat'l Competition
science
The May 11 competition ended an eight-month experience for the girls that began in September at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt
—Washington Post
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Kickstarter for Classrooms
business
DonorsChoose.org provides a simple way for people who want to lend a hand to help teachers meet their classroom needs.
—Vanity Fair
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Happiness....The Best Medicene
self
New research suggests that mood-enhancing activities can serve as a nutrient for the human body
—SALON
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Vietnamese Kids Smarter
technology
By grade 3 kids are learning to how to use Microsoft Windows. Vietnam is a 100% Windows XP monoculture.
—Neil's Blog
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A Dieing Art
art & design
As a lover of exquisite hand-lettering, elegant vintage-inspired typography, and vibrant storefront signage, I was instantly smitten with Sign Painters (public library)
—brain pickings
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Investing Where It Counts
global
Nobel laureates, political leaders, and celebrity NGO founders all agree that an investment with the possibility of infinite returns is the investment in young women.
—GOOD
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Public Markets Catalyze
urban
The farmer gets a guaranteed base of consumers, and the neighborhood gets good food and local jobs.
—GOOD
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The Happy States
culture
Live in Hawaii, Colorado, or Minnesota? Chances are, you’re happier than your brethren in Mississippi, Kentucky, and West Virginia
—FastCo
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Protein Could Change Biotech
technology
A tiny molecular machine used by bacteria to kill attacking viruses could change the way that scientists edit DNA.
—Forbes
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Human Liver Outside Body
science
A new machine can keep human livers warm and functioning outside the body for 24 hours before successfully transplanting them
—POPSCI
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Housing Rebound Continues
business
Building permits climbed to the highest level in almost five years, adding to signs of progress in the housing market that's helping boost the economy.
—NPR
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Solar-Powered Medical Airship
science
Solar Impulse, a well-funded project based in Switzerland, has already flown a plane day and night using just the sun
—CO.EXIST
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3D Printer For Organs
technology
Autodesk has teamed up with bioprinting company to deliver the future of personalized medicine: new organs that can be printed just for you.
—Fast Company
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Before Birth, Babies Learn Language
science
A new study shows how newborns can tell the difference between their native language and a foreign one.
—POPSCI
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Stethoscope: Diagnose Pneumonia
science
Every year 2.1 million children die from pneumonia—more than die from HIV, malaria, and measles combined.
—GOOD
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10 Acts of Kindness
culture
Pixar movies look like they’re for children, but their stories are universal tales that tug at the heartstrings.
—FLAVORWIRE
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Bandage Inspired By Spiderweb
science
These new easy-to-rip-off bandages aren’t just to make your life slightly more convenient. They’re going to play an important role for sick kids in hospitals.
—Co.EXIST
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More High Schoolers To College
culture
Today's high school students are taking more math and science courses and going straight to college after graduation.
—GOOD
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Amputee Climbs 103 Stories
self
A man with a mind-controlled bionic leg climbed to the top of Chicago’s famous Willis (SEARS) Tower Sunday
—POPSCI
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The Story Behind Sandy's Viral Photo
technology
On the morning the storm hit New York City, Nick Cope snapped a photo of rising flood waters from the window of his Red Hook, Brooklyn apartment. Then things got interesting.
—American Photo
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Biodegradable Shoes Are Here
environment
One Moment is going even further by manufacturing footwear “from soft and durable bioplastics that are not only eco-friendly in construction, they’re 100 percent biodegradable.”
—bigthink
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Art From Abandonment
art & design
Russian street artist nikita nomerz transforms abandoned structures by re-purposing their features into distinctive characters through graffiti.
—designboom
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Removing Salt From Water
technology
Finding clean water can be a matter of life and death. Globally 3.4 million people die each year due to a lack of clean water, roughly the population of Los Angeles.
—Co.Exist
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Sculptures Symbolize Perseverance
art & design
The visual representation of horses running on the river's surface, symbolize the struggles and perseverance, the simple grace yet powerful attitude that everybody needs in difficult situations.
—My Modern Met
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Robots & Autism
technology
Toy robots can bring out the kid in anyone, but children with autism are especially mesmerized by them
—FastCo
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Making A Violin Isn't easy
art & design
Almost wholly self-taught, Needham relies solely on word of mouth — and whatever marketing approaches he can devise to sell his violins.
—Washington Post
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Architecture & Math Intertwined
architecture
Thanks to modern technology, architects can explore a variety of exciting design options based on complex mathematical languages, allowing them to build groundbreaking forms.
—FlavorWire
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A Liquid Cooled LED Bulb?
technology
If you miss the sun-like glow of the old Edison bulbs and care about energy savings -- and price is not an issue -- then this bulb is for you.
—PopSci
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From Homeless To Harvard
self
Sometimes, though, we need one of those beat-the-odds kinds of stories to remind us that it's still possible for kids to overcome even the direst circumstances.
—GOOD
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Increase Your Walking Speed
self
There’s no saddle. Instead, you’re suspended in place with a swinging harness.
—Co.Exist
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Wood Waste Stronger Than Kevlar
science
Cellulose by-product materials with applications in military defense, engineering, medicine, and consumer products.
—inHabitat
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Feet of Engineering
technology
The P&O lab is expansive—parts of it resemble a tidy garage workshop mashed up with a sculptor’s studio.
—GA Tech Alumni Magazine
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Street Art & Spirit
art & design
They call it the “Great Wall of Mumbai,” and it is just one part of the Wall Project, a growing, bottom-up social movement to paint unattractive walls around Mumbai.
—FORBES
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Deaf & Hearing Music For First Time
science
How much of our experience of music is the cultural connotations we have absorbed and how much of it can be conveyed to someone who is hearing everything for the first time?
—The Atlantic
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Adaptive Technology Opens Doors
technology
Learning a new video game can be frustrating. For kids with a disability, the experience can be especially hard. If you can’t play with other kids, it’s like being picked last for kickball.
—WIRED
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Energy from Moonlight?
technology
Spheres are able to concentrate diffused moonlight into a steady source of energy.
—Inhabitat
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Letters of Fatherly Advice
culture
Five very public dads reveal love, patience and support through private letters to their children.
—BrainPickings
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Vertical Farms Take Root
technology
Vertical farms offer the vision of growing year-round, wherever we want, unaffected by droughts and weather-related events, while saving outside space.
—FastCo
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Young Entrepreneurs Making Impact
culture
DoSomething.org is focused on creating a “massive (fun) movement of teens taking action to fix causes they care about.”
—Forbes
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Free Rides and Free Books
culture
From New York City to Los Angeles, a vintage cab, offering free rides to strangers along the way.
—GOOD
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Inventions Made by Mistake
self
Think necessity is the mother of invention? Not always. There is a very thin line between brilliant innovation and absolute failure.
—INC
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Music Glove Helps Paralyzed Fingers
science
Researchers at Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) and Atlanta’s Shepherd Center conducted a study focusing on people with weakness and sensory loss due to SCI.
—futurity.org
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Vegetables Grown In Parking Space
technology
Short on space but hankering for some fresh vegetables? The $70,000 Agri-Cube might be the answer to your problems.
—Co.EXIST
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The Magic Of Central Park
urban
You cannot live without establishing an equilibrium between the inner and outer.
—Brain Pickings
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Gabby Douglas' New Brand
self
How does this quirky portrait mesh with her new brand as America's Olympic hero
—Salon
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7 Minutes Of Terror
science
Here's an interesting engineering challenge. Fly an unmanned spacecraft carrying a 2,000 pound rover 300 million miles to Mars.
—Big Think
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Making It To The Top
self
Rock steady: At 19, Alexandria’s Sasha DiGiulian is arguably the best female climber in the world.
—The Washington Post
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Change Your Life In Ten
health
There are a number of other things research says we can do to make life better but we don't need to do them every day:
—Spaces
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100 Design Changers
art & design
A thoughtfully curated inventory of abstract concepts that defined and shaped the art and craft of graphic design
—Brain Pickings
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Kids Of The Google Science Fair
science
These kids have come up with projects that can do everything from helping meth addicts to improving breast cancer testing. They’re also all 18 and under.
—Co Exist
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And It Slides Right Off
science
The applications are endless: from plane wings to which ice can’t stick to signs that you can’t grafitti on
—Co Exist
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Craziest Sports You've Never Seen
culture
Events like mutton busting, Big Wheel racing and live monster wrestling won't be featured in London this year; and photographer Sol Neelman likes it that way.
—NPR
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Lifelike Street Art
art & design
Visitors can become a part of these murals. If you dare, you can even get eaten by a voracious dinosaur or douse a scary fire-breathing dragon.
—My Modern Met
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Riding From Bejing To London
self
She has slept inches from scorpions, broken her ribs and separated from her husband during the 8,000-mile endurance ride spanning nine countries.
—The Telegraph
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Tweeting Olympians
global
This summer the Twittersphere is booming with #London2012 fever — and we have some seriously social media-savvy Olympians to thank
—Greatist
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A Better Way
culture
Chuck Templeton underwent a dramatic change in values, in the process developing a new business that may transform the way we interact with our neighbors.
—Good Business
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Turning Obstacles In To Assets
business
How Extremely Successful People (And Even Homer Simpson) Turn Obstacles Into Assets
—Forbes
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Education's Unlimited Future
culture
New Charter University can be accessed for free online by anyone. Is its freemium model going to truly democratize higher education?
—Co Exist
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$10 Robot Could Save Schools
technology
Such a low-cost machine could prove to be revolutionary for education in poorer countries around the world.
—Wired
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Solar Power From Unseen Light?
science
Much of the light spectrum doesn’t register to the human eye. A new device could go right on top of existing panels, to help get more energy from the sun.
—Co Exist
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The Truth Behind Happiness
culture
Things you didn't know about happiness.
—Spaces
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Small Plots Of Land Save Village
art & design
Land ownership is an important factor in getting people on an upwardly mobile path. But how much land do you need to own? Less than you would think.
—Co Exist
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The Computer As An Artist
technology
Computers have taken over an astonishing array of tasks humans used to do. But can they tell us a good story?
—Studio 360
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How Good Books Can Change You
self
Ever read a book that's changed your life? You're not imagining it -- the process of digesting a character or a series actually turns you into a different person.
—The Atlantic
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The T-Shirt Battery
technology
Our T-shirts could have more functions; for example, a flexible energy storage device that could charge your cell phone.
—Co Exist
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The King Of US National Parks
environment
The world’s first national park, and with 3,000 square miles of unspoilt beauty, Yellowstone is like nowhere else on Earth.
—BBC Travel
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Life Lessons From The Family Dog
self
While Felix is not exactly what we’d anticipated as we first clipped him to the leash, he seems happy to be along for the ride, together.
—Good Lifestyle
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2012 National Georgrahic Photos
environment
Our partners over at National Geographic just sent us some of their most eye-catching entries from the 2012 National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest.
—My Modern Met
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Sharing Bicycles Saves Lives
culture
Barcelona started its bike sharing program, Bicing, in 2007. Two years later, more than 180,000 citizens had enrolled.
—Good News
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A Sustainable Future: 4 Concepts
culture
A scenario where sustainability and strong community ties are emphasized; and a world where the sharing economy has taken off on a global scale.
—Co Exist
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A Restaurant Run By Robots
technology
A robot-themed restaurant is proving to be a success after opening in Harbin, located within northeast China's Heilongjiang Province
—Wired
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The Journey Of Curiosity
science
Curiosity will go from 13,000 mph to zero in those seven minutes, and even worse, scientists have to sit at home base and wait it out
—POPSCI
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Rock, Paper, Scissors,...Robot Hand
technology
So much for best two out of three.
—POPSCI
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The Fututre Is Better Than You Think
culture
But what is curious about this situation is that in nearly every measurable way, the world is much better off than it has ever been.
—Forbes
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The 500-Mile Electric Car
technology
To get more out of our batteries, we’re going to have to design them differently. One suggestion: Use the air around them to add to their power.
—Co Exist
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32 Innovations Of Tomorrow
technology
That’s what this issue is about: all the little failures, trivialities and not-quite-solved mysteries that make the successes possible.
—The New York Times
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10 Reasons To Climb Kilimanjaro
environment
Why do 40,000 people a year seek to climb the world’s highest freestanding mountain–a mountain so popular it has become known as “Everyman’s Everest”?
—National Geographic
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Dominoes Recreate Van Gogh
art & design
The trial-and-error process of setting it up is almost more mesmerizing than its eventual destruction, which the video documents from every angle.
—The Atlantic
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Donating Organs Through Facebook
health
Every day, an estimated 18 people die waiting for an organ transplant. Can Facebook change that?
—Mother Nature Network
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Tightrope Walk Over Niagara Falls
self
Nik Wallenda walks over Niagara Falls on a tightrope, last week.
—Wired
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Solar Power At Night
science
Eventually, we’re going to replace all of the energy requirements of the world.
—Co Exist
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Ideas From Across The Globe
global
From the good folks at the Infinite Thinking Machine, here’s another fun episode highlighting innovative ideas from across the globe.
—KQED
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A Story About Customer Delight
business
The Ritz-Carlton staff clearly went the extra mile for Chris’s son and I’m sure they’ll be going back, and telling lots of others who will then tell lots more!
—Customer Think
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The Beauty Of Imagination
self
Urville: An Autistic Savant’s Remarkable Imaginary City, 20 Years in the Making
—Brain Pickings
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Living To 100 And Beyond
health
We interviewed people in their 100s to find out how they did it.
—Forbes
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The Patch That Monitors Your Blood
technology
A new painless patch will soon send your vital signs wirelessly to your phone, giving you constant analytics on your health.
—Co Exist
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Enjoying Ketchup To The Last Drop
science
MIT PhD candidate Dave Smith and his team have created a way to empty the bottle once and for all with the help of LiquiGlide.
—The Verge
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A School On The Barter System
culture
Education can be expensive. But a new learning system lets you pay your teachers with your own skills or goods.
—Co Exist
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Space Station Photos Of Earth
global
These amazing photos of Earth were taken by astronauts in the International Space Station through special photographic equipment.
—Amazing Data
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Tiny Companies Making Millions
business
Companies with less than 50 employees figured out how to turn each of these niches into multi-million dollar revenue streams.
—The Street
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MIT Creating Happiness Barometer
science
If only every location was equipped with a Mood Meter.
—Bost Inno
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Coke Cams Capture Kindness
self
Security cameras may be used to deter the bad guys from committing crimes, but occasionally they do capture acts of kindness by everyday heroes.
—Taxi
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Farmers Using Social Media
business
Beginning Farmers Are Using New Media to Advocate for an Old Vocation
—Good Environment
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Folding Bike Is Changing Transit
urban
Sixty four percent of trips in the U.S. are two miles or less.
—Good Business
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The Car That Runs On Air
technology
Electric cars taking too long? There might soon be a new way to power your car gas-free, brought to you by the people behind the world’s cheapest car
—Co Exist
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Three Nerdy and Real Superheroes
technology
The algorithm correctly predicted twice as much crime as LAPD analysts using best practices in a double-blind study.
—Co Exist
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New TV Show Meant To Inspire
science
An new show on the National Geographic called The Link tells the history of human innovation in 5 episodes, and gets a little dangerous doing so.
—Co Exist
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5 Kids Changing The World
culture
These kids’ results are anything but amusing. They’re potentially world changing.
—Co Exist
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The Honey Hunters Of Nepal
global
When we think of honey, we don’t think of scaling a cliff with giant bees to get it.
—Visual News
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Turn Trash Into Power
environment
That’s the idea of the Muckbuster.
—Co Exist
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An Efficient State Of Mind
environment
The degree to which the entire industry is moving towards environmental building practices and energy efficiency was indeed striking.
—Sustainable Cities Collective
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A Satellite Financed By T-Shirt Sales
self
The question is: which is more important, the art or the science?
—Wired
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Dark Chocolate Key To Healthy Heart
health
Dark chocolate lowers blood pressure and cholesterol, which are the main culprits in heart attacks and strokes.
—Big Think
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Silicon Valley: Real Things, Real Jobs
urban
In the past two years manufacturing has been rising, mostly due to growth in the tech sector: a net increase of 7,300 jobs, up 4.8%.
—Forbes
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10 Years Later: Cincinnati Heals
urban
In ten years time, the city center has experienced a resurrection from what appeared to be a near death experience.
—Streets Blog
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A Musical Wall At A Hospital
art & design
Here, without any ability to read sheet music, a child can draw shapes on a projected screen that will play back as a melody.
—Co Design
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Rise Of The Micro Economy
business
As more and more services let people monetize their own assets and knowledge, it’s creating a new sector of the economy.
—Co Exist
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9-Year-Old Improves School Lunches
health
Martha Payne is a 9-year-old Scottish girl with a taste for good, healthy food.
—Good Is
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From Old Park To New Art
art & design
This June, a group of creatives based in Berlin plans to revamp and reestablish the newly christened "Kulturpark" as a haven for public art.
—Good Is
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Tomorrow's Innovators
urban
People with passion are responsible for the world’s greatest innovations.
—Forbes
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Twitter and Charity
culture
Claire Diaz-Ortiz amplifies the best uses of the hashtag empire, such as charity.
—Fast Company
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A Robot on Your Shoulder
technology
The MH-2 (for “miniature humanoid”) is a remotely controlled robot that lives on your shoulder.
—Popsci
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How to Stick With It
culture
This ability to believe in your vision despite current reality is fundamental. You cannot intentionally change the world without it.
—Fast Company
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Green from Good Engineering
science
The objective of making something work better leads to engineering innovations.
—Co.Design
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The Best in Sustainable Seafood
health
The supermarket chain doing the most to sell fish in a way that doesn’t destroy our oceans.
—Co.Exist
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Germany Sets Solar Record
technology
Germany has almost as much solar power capacity as the rest of the world combined.
—Wired.Co.UK
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Cultivating The Desert
environment
The Sahara Forest Project has a simple yet ambitious goal: to grow vegetation in the desert.
—Wired
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Armstrong Narrates Moon Landing
science
Armstrong is almost as famous for his reluctance to talk about his experience as he is for making that “one small step.”
—Popsci
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Apollo Astronauts Tracked in 3-D
technology
In the future Robinson hopes to develop 3-D maps of the remaining Apollo landing sites, then publicly post the data for anyone who wants to use it.
—Wired Science
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Cancer Sensor Created by Teen
science
It’s also 90% accurate, 400 times more sensitive, and 26,000 times less expensive than today’s methods. In short: It’s a lot better.
—Fast CoExist
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Comment:

TOMS: One for One
global
With every pair of shoes you purchase, TOMS will give a pair to a child in need.
—TOMS
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Tracing Subway Evolution
urban
New research digs up the underlying rules governing the shape of subway systems across the world.
—Fast CoExist
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Comment:

An Eisenhower Leadership Lesson
culture
#1: How to Build and Sustain Morale
—Art of Manliness
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Library for the Homeless
self
"Feel empowered to help change the world―even if it is just one child at a time."
—GOOD Education
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Creating Lving Buildings
architecture
The Living Building Standard results in some of the most energy-efficient and environmentally friendly structures around.
—Fastcoexist
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Comment:

When Brain Injuries Create Geniuses
health
If you could choose to be an acquired savant, perhaps sacrificing speech for another virtuoso's skill, would you?
—Big Think
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Comment:

The Energy Gym
technology
But what if there was a point to exercise, aside from the distant possibility of losing weight? Like generating electricity, for instance.
—Fastcoexist
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The Blind Changing the iPhone
culture
At first many blind people thought that the iPhone would never be accessible to them, with its flat glass screen. But the opposite has proved true.
—The Atlantic
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Forest in the Big City
environment
This fact and the contrast of the lush, green patch that sprouts from the center of the concrete roughness of the city, make the small Trianon an incredible spot.
—Treehugger
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How Dogs Beat the Neaderthals
science
Over 20,000 years ago, humans won the evolutionary battle against Neanderthals. They may have had some assistance in that from their best friends.
—The Atlantic
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Robot "Spider" Weaves Web
technology
This three-week-old robot created at the MIT Media Lab’s Mediated Matter group is spinning a web.
—POPSCI
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Drug Seeks to Stop Alzheimer’s
science
Experts say the study will be one of the few ever conducted to test prevention treatments for any genetically predestined disease.
—New York Times
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The Environment & Creativity
self
For most of human history creativity was something that came from the muses; it was about flashes of insight from another world.
—Big Think
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Comment:

Encouraging Kids
culture
What could be wrong with encouraging kids to set their sights high?
—Mind Shift
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Comment:

Shipping Container "Cities"
architecture
Large, colorful, multi-family “cities” of work spaces and homes built from shipping containers in London, Mexico, Amsterdam and, perhaps soon, New York.
—Sustainable Cities
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Paralyzed Student Walks
self
A team designed and built a robot exoskeleton that enabled Whitney to stand and walk.
—GOOD
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Comment:

Informal Recyclers In Brazil
technology
Brazil is now trying to turn this army of informal recyclers into a crack recycling operation capable of collecting and selling a city’s recyclables without central coordination
—FastCo
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Mothers Are Special
culture
She taught me valuable lessons about the role of work in a woman’s life: I learned that work can be a solace, a refuge, a turning point.
—Globe and Mail
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Better Than An Igloo
architecture
Building incredibly efficient buildings is hard enough, but it gets a lot harder when you have to make them be able to work in the freezing conditions of rural Alaska.
—FastCo
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Still Racing At 70
self
I can still remember Julie rolling toward that start line as if she were part of a gracefully constructed piece of moving, three-dimensional pastel art.....
—Bicycling
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Artificial Retinas & Blind patients
technology
Two British men who were completely blind for years have regained some of their vision
—i09
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Paralyzed Woman + Marathon
self
It took 16 days and one impressive bionic exoskeleton, but she did it. Watch the video and try not to tear up a little.
—POPSCI
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Food Factory Transformed
environment
Factory will become a zero-energy, food business incubator, research facility, education space, and working urban farm.
—InHabitat
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Wacky Designs
architecture
The allure of the metropolitan lifestyle is creating an urban density nightmare for planners and those in the architecture sector.
—DesignBuild
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Eternally Motivated
self
Motivation is an attitude, it is a habit. It can be cultivated, nurtured, boosted and instilled like all other habits.
—Pick the Brain
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Unknown Inventor Saving The World
science
In his spare time, he’s come up with solutions for water, cooking, and energy quandaries, improving lives from the Sudan to India.
—CO.Exist
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Comment:

20 Inspirational Quotes
self
Scouring the web from time to time looking for awesome insights and super-inspiring words from the world’s great teachers.
—FinerMinds
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What Was Picasso Like
art & design
One of the aims of Picasso and Modern British Art has been to think about Picasso’s relationships with British artists and writers.
—TATE
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7 Viral Videos to Inspire You
culture
Thought leaders worldwide have taken to online digital media to spread important ideas that can change the world.
—Life Scoop
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Teaching Children Urban Design
art & design
Together parents, teachers and professionals can teach future generations about the different ways to live and build a community.
—Urban Times
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Six-year-old Computer Expert
technology
Creating video game emulators since he was four and knows computers better than most adults.
—Slash Gear
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How Green Cities Clean Up Trash
science
It’s convenient to think of the trash can as a black hole into which scraps and discards and mistakes disappear. But these cities know better.
—GOOD Environment
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Students Invent a Pothole Repair
technology
A little non-Newtonian fluid pothole filler could spare your wheel alignment after a harsh winter.
—POPSCI
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Making Smarter Computers
technology
By studying how toddlers learn and adapt to the world around them, computer programmers are trying to create smarter computers--machines that think more like humans.
—FastCo
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Hitchcock on the Secret of Happiness
self
In this brilliantly wise and articulate short excerpt from an archival interview, the great Alfred Hitchcock shares his definition of happiness
—Brain Pickings
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Deer-Shaped Electrical Towers
architecture
The towering animal structures remind us of Jin Choi and Thomas Shine's Land of Giants.
—Modern Met
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Young Americans Are Driving Less
environment
Today's teens and twenty-somethings don't seem all that interested in buying a set of wheels.
—The Atlantic
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Comment:

How 17 Equations Changed the World
culture
Learn to value equations and uncover vital features of the world.
—Brain Pickings
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Life Reboot to Hundreds
urban
Homeboy Industries, the passion project of an L.A. priest is helping to change lives for the better.
—Fast Co
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Comment:

Why Every Monday Matters
culture
What if we all smiled more, planted a tree, donated blood, wrote a note of gratitude, or took better care of our health?
—FAST COMPANY
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Are You Happy?
health
Happiness isn’t easy to quantify, but a lot of people have tried.
—FastCo
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Comment:

Brilliant Management Ideas
business
A lot of these ideas may seem strange, but they result from a willingness to set aside convention and focus on the realities of the workplace.
—GOOD
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Popcorn Actually Good For You
health
If you think popcorn is just another salty snack, think again. A new study is bringing popcorn into the same arena as fruits and vegetables. They are nutritional powerhouses.
—The Atlantic
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Working Inside The Box
art & design
Today, when these containers aren’t moving cargo on truck, ship, and rail, they are being used for various methods of habitation: a home, office, and—in at least one case—an environmental education center.
—Ecomagination
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How Entrepreneurs Hire
business
Diving into a small business can be a shock if you are used to a larger organization. Consider spending time with entrepreneurs, and informally advising a few, to get a better idea of your unique value in the business.
—Inc.
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Timeless Commencement Addresses
culture
It’s graduation season. Let’s use this as an invitation to remember some of the most compelling, provocative and deeply inspirational speeches of years past.
—Brain Pickings
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Delivering Tacos Via Quadcopter
business
It’s the kind of tech startup that we could really get excited about. A Web site has popped up that offers a unique service: tacos airlifted directly to your doorstep via unmanned quadcopter drone.
—Pop Sci
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Neuroscience at Early Age
science
Neuroscience may seem like an advanced subject of study, perhaps reserved for college or graduate school. Two researchers propose that it be taught earlier. As in first grade.
—Mind Shift
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What Will Be Obsolete in 2020
culture
Expounding on the ideas of the wildly popular article '21 Things That Will Be Obsolete in 2020,' we asked a few of those who attended Big Ideas Fest, to predict what they think will be obsolete in 2020.
—Mind Shift
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Unconventional Cancer Treatments
science
Breast cancer patients have a number of treatments available to them these days, from surgery to hormone therapy to chemotherapy. But new research is leading the quest for a cure in some odd directions.
—The Atlantic
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Puzzle Play Improves Math Skills
art & design
Psychologist Susan Levine and colleagues recently conducted a study that found 2-4 year-old children, who play with puzzles, have better spatial skills when assessed at 4 1/2 years of age.
—The Epoch Times
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Footage from Cameron's Dive
science
First video footage is surfacing from James Cameron’s record-setting dive to the deepest known point in Earth’s oceans, and the landscape down there is about what one might expect.
—Pop Sci
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Sparrows Change Their Tune
science
A new study confirms that sparrows in the Presidio District of San Francisco appear to have changed their tune and raised their voices to be heard over the increasingly noisy racket of the Golden Gate Bridge.
—Atlantic Cities
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Mobile Device Reads Thoughts
technology
New mobile device, iBrain, can read the electrical signals produced by your brain when it thinks. The device's makers want to decode those signals into human language and use the device to monitor patients with neurological disorders.
—Big Think
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Fully Biodegradable Shoe
art & design
Now a Spanish company called OneMoment is bringing that ancient, cutting-edge technology to the rest of us. Their completely biodegradable shoe--measuring only 2 millimeters thick on the sole.
—Co.Exist
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LittleSun Solar LED Lamp
art & design
The lamp's small size makes it easy to mount or carry around for charging during the day, as well as hang at night. On top of that, the LittleSun is less expensive and safer to operate than a kerosene lantern.
—The Verge
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Blind Use Sounds to 'See'
technology
Scientists in Jerusalem have developed a visual-to-auditory SSD involving headphones attached to a camera. The images taken by the camera are converted into sounds through a known algorithm.
—The Epoch Times
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Dog Heroes of Iraq & Afghanistan
global
Most of the dogs are trained at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas in a course that's grueling for both handlers and canines. Some smaller dogs enter into service too, like tiny Jack Russell terriers.
—Fast Company
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Lytro's Weird Design
technology
The Lytro has tech nerds buzzing about its futuristic technology. But the design has just as important a role in selling such a radical leap for photography.
—Co.Design
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6 Habits of True Strategic Thinkers
business
You're the boss, but you still spend too much time on the day-to-day. Here's how to become the strategic leader your company needs.
—Inc
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Leadership from Dirty Harry
business
No matter how badly things were going, Harry got results. Here are his five leadership keys — and you can use them, not shoot anyone, and still be a good company man or woman.
—Forbes
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Scientist Videos Son's First Words
culture
MIT scientist blew the curve for Flip cam-packing proud pops by capturing his son's every movement and word with a series of fisheye-lens cameras installed in every room.
—Fast Company
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Vertical Gardens & Urban Farms
environment
In response to global urban population, Terreform, Inc. has come up with innovative ways for New York City to deal with issues that arise with sustainability. The plan calls for total self-sufficiency.
—Inhabitat
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Bringing Comics to Music
art & design
Crumb’s covers for yesteryear’s forgotten masters were so influential in and of themselves that they spurred the rediscovery of many of these old records in the 1960s and 1970s.
—Brain Pickings
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Surreal Buildings
art & design
Victor Enrich is a Spanish photographer who rips all the science from architecture to create surreal and whimsical variations on existing buildings.
—Co.Design
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5,000 Bicycle Bells Sing With Wind
art & design
Amsterdam-based artist designs architectonical installations and sculptural art, and he just finished a project called Sound Architecture IV that is made from 5,000 repurposed bicycle bells set on steel pins.
—Inhabitat
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Be Free From Paralysis of Analysis
health
Self-analysis is not necessarily a bad thing. But there’s a difference between reflective positive self-analysis and brooding, perseverative self-analysis.
—Psych Central
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Eat Chocolate, Be Thinner
health
Good news for all! A press release from the Archives of Internal Medicine shows that chocolate eaters are thinner.
—Reporting On Health
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Why People in Cities Walk Fast
culture
Most work on urban walking speed dates back to 1976, when psychologists Marc and Helen Bornstein published a provocative paper on the topic in the top-tier journal Nature.
—Architecture Lab
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Scaling Future by Blending Past
architecture
How will the city of tomorrow reflect adaptive reuse of the city of today?
—Sustainable Cities
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New Way To Think About You
science
Connectome: How the Brain’s Wiring Makes Us Who We Are, proposes a new model for understanding the totality of selfhood, one based the emerging science of connectomics.
—Brain Pickings
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Leadership From America's Deli
business
Zingerman’s new book, it’s stuffed full with ideas (more than you can digest in one sitting) that can apply in any work place, whether it’s a small business or a corporate department
—Forbes
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'Father of Video Games' Reflects
culture
Ralph Baer, who turns 90 this year, discusses his life's work, which includes creating the Magnavox Odyssey, the first home video game console, and the iconic pattern game Simon
—The Atlantic
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Hitchcock on the Secret of Happiness
culture
In this brilliantly wise and articulate short excerpt from an archival interview, the great Alfred Hitchcock shares his definition of happiness.
—Brian Pickings
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Solutions for Homeless Housing
urban
These 14 designs for homeless housing provoke thought as to how we can meet the needs of disadvantaged people living in our own communities, and ensure that the situation is only temporary.
—Web Urbanist
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About Face
art & design
Solar panels have a reputation as being unsightly, but this U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon show home sheds the stereotype that photovoltaic arrays are eyesores.
—Dwell
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Internal Clock Affects on Health
health
Not getting enough sleep leaves us tired during the day. But the body's clock also affects mood, mental alertness, hunger, and heart function.
—The Atlantic
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Einstein's Ideas and Opinions
culture
Albert Einstein’s Ideas and Opinions, the definitive collection of the great thinker’s essays on everything from science and religion to government to human nature, gathered under the supervision of himself.
—Brain Pickings
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Art of Colorful Mimicry
art & design
We are always picking up habits of others and constantly adapting to our surroundings. In a series entitled Mimicry, a photography team works to explore and visually discuss these concepts.
—My Modern Met
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Find Purpose and Do What You Love
culture
“Find something more important than you are,” philosopher Dan Dennett once said in discussing the secret of happiness, “and dedicate your life to it.” But how, exactly, do we find that?
—Brain Pickings
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The New Rules of Innovation
business
In his new book, Vijay Vaitheeswaran argues that we’re thinking about worldchanging innovation all wrong: It’s not going to come from where we expect it.
—Co.Exist
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Microsoft Word's Affect On Work
business
Thirty years after Word was invented, we are no nearer to understanding the impact it has had on writing
—Guardian
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New York's First Subway in 60 Years
architecture
The Second Avenue subway is seventy years in the making, with nearly as many false starts and delays. The last completed full route was the Eighth Avenue Line, in 1932.
—Architizer
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Survive with Energy Drinks and Knife
environment
Kite surfer found himself stranded in the open ocean being attacked by sharks. With only mineral water, energy drinks, energy bars, and, most importantly, a knife he survived.
—Big Think
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Strange Buildings Around the World
architecture
Check out some of the strangest buildings from around the world, from baby grand pianos to exotic elephants. No inspiration seems too bizarre or out of reach.
—Amazing Data
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World's First Pedestrian Airbag
technology
Volvo has come out with the world's first commercial airbag designed to protect pedestrians rather than drivers in a car accident.
—Life Science
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A Floating Wind Farm
environment
Installing wind turbines in deep, turbulent seas is a laborious and expensive project. Here’s an idea: Put them on a boat.
—Co.Exist
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30-Story Hotel Built in 15 Days
art & design
A Chinese company has seemingly accomplished the impossible, putting up a 30-story building in half as many days.Construction on the 30-story hotel prototype was complete after 15 days of construction.
—ABC News
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40 of Don Draper’s Best Lines
art & design
While we wait to catch up with Mad Men during season five, which premieres on March 25, we thought we’d host a little party to celebrate the passing of Hamm’s 40th year.
—Flavor Wire
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Best Countries for Cleantech Startups
business
Where in the world does a solar company have the best chance of success? It’s not the economic powerhouse you might think, though the U.S. and China aren’t far behind.
—Co.Exist
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The Empire State Building
culture
Helen Keller was asked what she "saw" from the height. She responded with the incredible letter, within which lies one of the greatest, most evocative descriptions of the skyscraper and it’s surrounding.
—Letters of Note
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Winner of Rethink Preservation
environment
After 132 entries and 71,000 votes, The Union Depot in Keokuk, Iowa, won the grand prize of $10,000 to put towards its preservation and rehabilitation.
—Dwell
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Three Simple Words to Happiness
culture
What do you need to make your dreams come true? Three wishes? Think again. Martha Beck on a goal-setting strategy that will get you where you want to go.
—Oprah
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Architecture Without Architects
architecture
From Rome’s theater districts to China’s underground cities, Rudofsky peels the pretense of architecture from creative and utilitarian acts of building to reveal a vernacular, communal architecture.
—Brain Pickings
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Drive a Wheelchair with Your Tounge
science
Engineers are developing a wireless device that enables people with spinal cord injuries to operate a computer and maneuver a wheelchair simply by moving their tongues.
—Futurity
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The Lollipop House
architecture
Do you find this family residence in South Korea fun or a bit out there? If you were to live in a childhood-inspired home, how would it look like?
—Freshome
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Iconic Portraits by Top Illustrators
art & design
Check out Illustration Now! Portraits — a stunning new showcase of illustrated portraits by over 80 of the world’s most exciting artists.
—Brian Pickings
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Why So Long to Invent the Wheel?
science
The tricky thing about the wheel is not conceiving of a cylinder rolling on its edge. It's figuring out how to connect a stable, stationary platform to that cylinder.
—Scientific American
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Pushing Innovation
business
Great ideas never die. They are put into freeze until they either are introduced by someone else and THEY make millions while your company follows suit. So take charge and make your millions.
—Webdesigner Depot
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Coffee Shop Buzz Is Good
culture
A new study suggest the ambient background noise or buzz of conversation in public places can fuel creativity.
—Life Hacker
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Weird Vehicles that Need No Training
culture
You have to pass a test to get behind the wheel of a car, but by simply signing a lengthy wavier you can take off in a hover craft, tank, train and barge without one bit of training or testing.
—Lonely Planet
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Backyards Get Better
environment
From innovative projects about water use to simple neighborhood composting initiatives, Ioby is a Kickstarter for neighborhood improvement, and it’s expanding from New York to the whole country.
—Co.Exist
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Illuminating the History of Medicine
science
Technology has the potential to transform our concept of sickness. An expert demonstrates how the digital revolution can be used to change individual care and prevention, and even the economics of healthcare.
—Salon
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Water Tanks to Works of Art
art & design
For three months in the spring of 2013, water tanks around New York City will be transformed into works of public art, thanks to a campaign to teach residents to be more responsible with water.
—Taxi
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Mapping Innovative Cities
culture
With key factors of a good mayor, ethic mix, education, and intensity innovative cities can flourish in creating a space for ideas and inventions.
—Sustainable Cities Collective
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10 Amazing Letters From Presidents
culture
"Letters of Note" archives publishes notes from men who would hold or were holding the highest office in the land. Here are ten of their favorite letters from the presidents.
—Mental Floss
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Hard Boiled Housing: The Blob VB3
art & design
Belgian architectural firm designed the blob VB3, a smooth white structure that resembles a hard boiled egg. The egg-like living pod contains a bathroom, a kitchen, interior lighting, a bed and several niches
—If It's Hip, It's Here
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Fashioning Apollo
art & design
The story of the Apollo spacesuit is a surprising tale of an unexpected victory: of Playtex, maker of bras and girdles, over the large military-industrial contractors better positioned to secure the spacesuit contract.
—Brain Pickings
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Infographics Powered By Sun
business
Austria Solar's 2011 annual report ships in a foil package. Open it indoors and find a tastefully embossed cover, followed by many blank pages. The magic happens when you expose it to the sun.
—Co.Design
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Redesigning People
science
Radical human modification is coming, like it or not, by the end of this century—if not earlier. How much are you willing to alter yourself?
—The Atlantic
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Lego Prosthetic Arm
science
Engineering student Max Shepherd has built a Lego prosthesis that accurately mimics the full range of motion of a normal human arm.
—The Atlantic
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Images of Single Molecule Charges
science
Researchers have shown off the first images of the "charge distribution" in a single molecule, showing an intricate dance of electrons at tiny scales.
—BBC
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Stop Being a Slave To Data
culture
By their very nature, people are resistant to change. So if your goal is to innovate, why would you listen to them?
—Co.Design
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Chain-Link Lace Fence
art & design
Lace Fence — a high-end, metal fabric used to transform your average, industrial chain-link fence into a beautiful work of art (that’s still functional!)
—Flavor Wire
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Bandage Allows You To Save a Life
culture
If you’re already bleeding, why not send some of your blood to the national bone marrow registry, which might be able to connect you with someone whose life your marrow could save?
—Co.Exist
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Newspapers Power Batteries
technology
Old newspapers can be broken down into cellulose that can power batteries with producing byproducts that are as harmless as water.
—PopSci
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Cities Improving Citizens
urban
The Living Labs Global Award was created to encourage cities to strive for excellence in areas of mobility, tourism, smart housing and many other areas.
—Urban Times
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Child Creates New Molecule
science
When teacher instructed his fifth grade class to build molecules with modeling kits, he didn’t expect one of his students to make a scientific discovery.
—Humboldt State
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The Boxx: Electric Square Bike
technology
The Boxx, the battery-powered moped, is geared towards people who would rather ride a Macbook than a Harley if they could.
—Co.Exist
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Love Ever After
culture
Love letters are brought to life as a photographer unlocks the love stories of couples who have been together for over 50 years.
—Kick Starter
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The Sky Is The Limit
urban
Extreme urban climbing has become a youth sub-culture and each year more young Russians are taking to the skies of their city.
—The Telegraph
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Waterless Washing Machine
technology
The Orbit is a concept washing machine that uses no water and cleans clothes with dry ice in a matter of minutes. Is it too good to be true?
—Digital Trends
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Exhaustion Inspires
art & design
The faces of several climbers returning from Mount McKinley were photographed to capture the human reaction to such extreme elements.
—Flavor Wire
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The Boys Who Walked to Europe
global
Out of war and desperation several young boys make the grueling trek from Afghanistan, across the Middle East, to Europe in search of new life.
—The Guardian
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Urville: The Imaginary City
architecture
From remarkable architectural detail to the thoughtful cultural context, Urville offers a rare glimpse of the extreme frontiers of human ability and imagination.
—Brain Pickings
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Cities Make People Happy
culture
The cliche of the mean and unfriendly city dweller is untrue. People in cities are happier. Which is good, because it’s where we’ll all be living soon.
—Co.Exist
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Incredibly Elaborate Tiny Buildings
art & design
Japanese artist creates astoundingly detailed sculptures of tiny buildings. The sculptures are inspired by the Japanese art forms of bonsai and suiseki.
—Laughing Squid
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Sleepbox: Mini-Hotel for Travelers
global
A person stuck in an airport used to roll up a sweater like pillow and get a few minutes of shuteye.Now the Sleepbox has arrived as a saving grace.
—Good
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The Foldable Car
urban
The first fold-up car is coming to a city near you.This 6.5 foot car runs on two rechargeable batteries and is changing the future of urban travel.
—Big Think
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Fleeting & Fabulous: Art of Dirt
art & design
Museum features sculptures and installations of stuff an average person would wipe off with a sponge: mud, sand, rocks, twigs, grime, smog, and even skin cells.
—Co.Design
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Going Green Can Save You Green
business
Company rewards recycling by tracking amounts of recycled material and offering you discounts at participating stores.
—GreenBiz
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Leave Your Leftovers for Charity
business
What restaurants don't put on the table, they donate as cash to groups working on food insecurity, homelessness, and hunger.
—Co.Exist
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Skydiver Breaking Sound Barrier
global
A skydiver is set to become the first person to break the sound barrier during a free fall by leaping from a balloon on the edge of space later this year.
—The Telegraph
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Algae Could be the Future of Biofuel
science
Algae is no longer slime from a fish tank. Scientists and entrepreneurs hurry to turn the organism into biofuel on a scale that's commercially viable.
—Good
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Cathedral of 55,000 Lights
art & design
The Ghent Light Festival featured a cathedral of over 55,000 lights. Energy wasted? On the contrary, they were LED.
—Fresh Home
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Your Morning Coffee is Good for You
health
That cappuccino ritual? It’s full of antioxidants, isn’t a diuretic, and if the caffeine keeps you from sleeping, just try decaf.
—National Post
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The World's Best Long Walks
environment
Forget planes, trains and automobiles. Check out the greenest and greatest way to travel using your own two feet.
—Lonely Planet
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The Bicycle Bus
culture
Kid friendly and environmentally approved. Children in the Netherlands are pedaling their way to school on the bicycle school bus.
—Co.Exist
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Year's Most Generous Billionaire
business
Ms.Cargill died in 2006, but she contunies to be ranked as a generous billionaire. She left all her shares of Cargill stock to charitable foundations.
—Forbes
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Building Blocks of Happiness
culture
City attributes do indeed make a difference. The more people feel as if their city is beautiful, clean, and safe the more happiness they feel.
—Sustainable Cities
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Arts Inspire a Sustainable Generation
architecture
Boston student center, Arts for Humanity, encourages students to build with sustainability while building self-confidence.
—Green Biz
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By the City/For the City
culture
New Yorkers are getting hands on with ideas to create urban improvement.
—GOOD
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Plastic Eating Fungus
environment
An Amazonian fungus, found by a group of students from Yale, could eat our most durable landfill waste.
—Pop Sci
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Nashville’s Healthy Initiatives
health
Nashville is mplementing programs for healthier lifestyles. Activities include a monthly mayor walk and companies offering healthy lunch choices.
—Wall Street Journal
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New Focus on Old Gadgets
technology
Old gadgets get new life as U.S. Micro takes tossed phones, computers, and all things electronic and placing them in schools and communities.
—GOOD
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They That Labored
culture
The 50 or so learned men who labored in teams to create the King James Bible did not set out to create a literary masterpiece.
—The Chronicle
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The SuperCooperators
culture
Life is based on competition — for the food, territory, mates, and other resources that will increase our own chances of survival and reproduction.
—Big Questions Online
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Going for Gold
health
Hannah Powell went from ballet to weightlifting. She has hopes of beating the boys and qualifying for the London 2012 Olympics.
—The Independent
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Using Nature To Nurture
health
Imagine if your health practitioner wrote out a prescription for kayaking, camping or rock climbing to help you through a health challenge?
—The Globe & Mail
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Smog Eaters
architecture
When applied to aluminum panels, the titanium dioxide coating interacts with sunlight to break down the smog-causing compound nitrogen oxide.
—GOOD
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Blasting Garbage Into Gas
technology
Plasma gasification, a technology turns trash into a fuel without producing emissions.
—WIRED
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The Reason for Recess
science
Physical activity does the body good, and there's growing evidence that it helps the brain too.
—TIME
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Biggest Plane in World
technology
The people who built the first private aircraft to fly into space are teaming up once again to construct the largest aircraft ever flown.
—PopSci
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Laughter Improves Health
health
Researchers have found that laughter can de-stress our bodies and improve heath.
—ksdk.com
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Green Transport Technology
urban
For years, bus systems across the country have been going green by switching over to vehicles powered by natural gas.
—GOOD Environment
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Smartphone Knows Your Thoughts
technology
Context-aware computing has been around for decades, but it’s been gaining steam as costs fall.
—The Globe & Mail
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100 Years From Now?
culture
Readers of BBC News Magazine give their predictions for how life will be 100 years from now.
—BBC News
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Robots Inspire Learning
technology
Children fall in love with robots because of the bots’ ambiguous nature and relative autonomy.
—Latitude
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This Is Generation Flux
business
The future of business is pure chaos. Here's how you can survive--and perhaps even thrive.
—Fast Company
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Tiny USB A Computer
technology
Norwegian developers have created one of the world's smallest computers on a USB-like stick.
—Syndey Morning Herald
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Synthetic Windpipe Breakthrough
science
Surgeons in Sweden replaced cancerous windpipe of man with one made in laboratory
—New York Times
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Rethinking Innovation
technology
What led Darwin to the theory of natural selection is grist for his mill, but so too is what led Willis Carrier to invent the air conditioner.
—BQO
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Smartphone App Rewards Exercise
technology
New phone tracking technology to reward walking and biking.
—Co.Exist
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Project Spurs Urban Renewal
urban
Efforts helped create a local arts charity, the Heidelberg Project, and helped tame crime in the neighborhood.
—Philanthropy
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Urban-Development Legends
urban
The history of local economic development is a story of academic fads.
—City Journal
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Social Media Power Influencer
art & design
Chris Brogan has an astonishing 122,000 identifiable followers on Twitter (up from 115,000 last week)
—Forbes
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Jobs Rise 15th Consecutive Month
business
■December capped a solid year of job growth as the economy generated positive hiring every month in the year for the first time since 2005.
—Marcus & Millichap Blog
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Blogging Moby-Dick
art & design
Kish carved out time for the Moby-Dick project around his full-time job as a librarian and the long commute that bracketed his work day on both ends.
—Common-Place
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Stocks Soar On Upbeat Data
art & design
The Dow rises 179 points after reports show that the manufacturing industry grew in December and that construction spending rose in November.
—LA Times
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The Rise of Local Mfg.
business
The appreciation for local goods has begun to fuel a resurgence in local manufacturing.
—GOOD News
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Google+ Gains Traction
technology
Google’s mission to compete with Facebook in social networking may be gaining speed.
—New York Times
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The Joy of Quiet
culture
In barely one generation we’ve moved from exulting in the time-saving devices that have so expanded our lives to trying to get away from them.
—New York Times
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Rare species discovered
science
A brainless and faceless fish was one of 15 rare species discovered during a series of marine surveys this year.
—The Independent
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Ecommerce Way Up
business
IBM Coremetric Benchmark’s snapshot of online shopping on Christmas Day revealed 16.4 percent growth over Christmas Day 2010
—Portfolio.com
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Freakonomics: What Went Wrong?
business
The word “freakonomics” has come to stand for a light-hearted and contrarian, yet rigorous and quantitative, way of looking at the world.
—AMERICAN Scientist
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Music On Their Deathbeds
art & design
There is usually something revealing about the music of a composer who feels death at his shoulder.
—slate.com
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How Smart Is This Bird?
science
Pigeons have now shown that they can learn abstract rules about numbers
—New York Times
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7 Christmas Songs That Don't Suck
culture
With the possible exception of Otis Redding, Ike & Tina Turner cranked out the best rendition of Merry Christmas Baby.
—Mother Jones
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People Are Awesome
culture
Movement growing around the country that finds wealthy donors secretly paying off people's layaway accounts at Kmart.
—GOOD News
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Cities Are Making Us More Human
urban
Harvard economist Edward Glaeser believes urbanization to be a solution to many unanswered problems.
—The European
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Attention Spans, After All
culture
Our preference for time-consuming entertainment options might also be seen as a reaction against sound bite culture
—National Post
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Visitors Changed Our Museum
art & design
The Oakland Museum published “How Visitors Changed Our Museum: Transforming the Gallery of California Art"
—ArtFWD
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Window Wonderland
art & design
The term “window shopping” takes on new meaning as boutiques put their creative might into an unspoken competition for the most imaginative displays.
—Financial Times
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America's Most Generous Cities
culture
Overall, more than half (56 percent) of adult Americans live in a household that donated money to a charity of some kind.
—The Atlantic
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How Does the Brain Perceive Art?
art & design
Our response to art is conditioned by all sorts of variables that have nothing to do with oil paint.
—Wired
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Quintillions of Possibilities
culture
The Polish teenager recently won his title in Thailand, lining up all six colors on all six sides of the cube-shaped toy in an average time of 8.65 seconds.
—Wall Street Journal
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Thermostat for the iPhone generation
technology
The Nest thermostat is designed to learn homeowners' schedules and surroundings.
—Chicago Tribune
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Creating Artificial Intelligence
technology
In designing chips that bear some structural resemblance to the brain, so-called neuromorphic chips, neuroscience was a guiding principle as well
—New York Times
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Happiest (And Saddest) Countries
culture
Whatever happiness is to you, there’s some conditions under which it most readily blossoms.
—FORBES
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'Super Earth' exists
science
French astronomers earlier this year confirmed the first rocky exoplanet to meet key requirements for sustaining life.
—NZ Herald
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Chinese Stone Carvers
art & design
The town of Dangcheng once drew buyers from around the world for its ornate carvings and statues.
—The Globe and Mail
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Size Up Economic Indicators
global
More than an examination of macroeconomics, though, Worldshapin is a fun, informative toy. Make fun shapes!
—co.exist
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Concept Is Half Car, All Driver
technology
The car that just might foreshadow next-generation personal mobility in crowded cities.
—Wired
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Fluorescent Spray Identifies Cancer
health
A group led by the National Cancer Institute has developed a fluorescent spray that can label cancer cells within a minute.
—Technology Review
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Organic Can Feed World
science
The current food production system, a 75-year-old experiment, leaves nearly 1B of the world's 7B humans seriously undernourished today.
—The Atlantic
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Become a British Spy?
technology
The GCHQ — Britain’s secretive agency of intelligence experts — wants to find new spies.
—Wired
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Hotel From Shipping Crates
architecture
Each room comes with a trunk that hinges open to reveal a desk stocked with drinks, a logbook, information packs and electrical sockets.
—Dezeen magazine
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WWII Bunker To Energy Hub
technology
A disconcerting reminder of the past is transformed into a constructive symbol of clean-energy.
—Green Source
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Skyscraper With A Forest Inside
architecture
Architects are starting to craft biological buildings in cities that blur the line between green space and living space.
—co.exist
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Africa Unleashed
global
A new Africa that bears little resemblance to the caricature of a "dark continent" that still rears its head in the media.
—Foreign Affairs
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Cyber Monday Biggest Ever In U.S.
business
Monday was the highest-grossing online shopping day in U.S. history, with spending reaching $1.25 billion.
—CNN
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A Better Life In Sight
science
For Dr Khatun, 54, it is just another operation – but one that should spare a child from a lifetime of blindness.
—Financial Times
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Retailers See Record Numbers
business
American consumers opened their wallets over the holiday weekend in a way they had not since before the recession.
—New York Times
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Engineering the 10 000-Year Clock
technology
Parallel computing pioneer Danny Hillis dreamed up the 10 000-Year Clock as a way to encourage long-range thinking.
—IEEE Spectrum
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Are We Getting Nicer?
culture
The pace of moral progress has accelerated in the last few decades.
—New York Times
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An Underground Park In NYC
architecture
The proposed “low line” park would take up three blocks underneath the Lower East Side, Manhattan.
—CBS-New York
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World’s Cheapest Plastic Lightbulb
global
No electric grid but a simple solution - a plastic bottle.
—Co.Exist
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Crowdfunded Public Art Projects
urban
Crowdfunding has taken off among artists and entrepreneurs as an easier way to raise money.
—The Atlantic
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The Box Is the Thing
business
The growing focus on sustainability means that luxury providers are increasingly looking at containers through green-tinted glasses.
—New York Times
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Food As Art
art & design
A cutaway image of a pot roast from Nathan Myhrvold's Modernist Cuisine. Photo: The Cooking Lab, LLC
—New Statesman
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The Tweaker
technology
His gift lay in taking what was in front of him and ruthlessly refining it.
—The New Yorker
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Stem-Cells & Heart Regeneration
science
Research demonstrated a 30-percent increase in healthy heart-muscle cells.
—University of Buffalo
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Keyed to Detail
art & design
It’s a big challenge for a designer to come up with intelligent objects, which will last…
—New York Times
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The World's Longest Floating Bridge
architecture
What does it take to get 230 tons of concrete to float?
—Popular Mechanics
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Car Steered By Thought
technology
German scientists develop new technology able to read the driver's brain waves.
—Mother Nature Network
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The Ground Bot
art & design
The GroundBot system by Swedish firm Rotundus is a remote-controlled, all-weather polycarbonate sphere.
—BLDGBLOG
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Google As A Visionary
culture
Space elevators, driverless cars and Internet-enabled household devices being produced in secret Google lab.
—Fox News
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A Life Saving Bag
health
2.6 billion people don't access to toilets and millions die from diseases caused by poor sanitation, Anders Wihelmson created a bag to change that.
—PopularScience
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EyeWriter
technology
The eyewriter project is a collaborate research effort that allows graffiti writers and artist with paralysis to draw using only their eyes.
—Graffiti Research Lab
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Man Made Tornado
technology
The Mercedes-Benz Museum can repurpose its internal ventilation system to form an artificial tornado.
—BLDGBLOG
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Ball Of Energy
technology
Four Harvard students develop a soccer ball that covert the energy used during play to electricity for lighting.
—Discovery.com
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Pebble Breaks Sound Barrier
science
A pebble that is dropped into water ejects an air-filled cavity at supersonic speeds.
—NewScientist
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Playing With Fire
architecture
An outdoor fire place designed for children.
—Contemporist
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Revolutionary Wheel
culture
MIT researchers have re-created the wheel to help change behavior.
—PSFK
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Bottom Up Diplomacy
global
A movement started by Cuban artist, scholars hopes to change the United States policy toward Cuba.
—The New York Times
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Curing The Incurable
health
Inspirations from unexpected sources is helping scientist discover new cures.
—PopularScience
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Alabama's Homeboys
culture
Former gang members travel to rural Alabama to speak to kids about gang life and poverty.
—LA Times
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Freefall From Space
science
A 'space diver' attempts to become first person to go supersonic in free-fall.
—NewScientist
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New Piano Man
art & design
He goes by the Napkin Holder and he doesn't need sheet music.
—Youtube
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Its All In The Mind
science
Researchers use video games to determine the differences in learning rates.
—BBC News
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Free Money
culture
Bank gives money for others to give away
—Springwise
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Sesame Street's 40th
culture
Sesame Street celebrates 40 years on the air
—New York Times
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Next-Gen Costume
art & design
A different type of Halloween costume
—booooooom.com
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Keith Schofield
art & design
Keith Schofield hits the pause, rewind and fast-forward in his new music video
—keithschofield.com
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Immeasurable Intelligence
science
What does your IQ really mean?
—newscientist.com
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2010 Olympic Medals
technology
Each medal at Vancouver Games to have unique design
—reuters.com
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Open Calories
health
Coca-Cola has announced global plans to include caloric information on the front of nearly all product packages
—Designtaxi.com
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Musical Hope
culture
Musician Changes Tone of Impoverished Village
—New York Times
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Color Blind Primates
science
Possible cure for color blindness
—nature.com
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Beauty Evolution
science
Women Are Getting More Beautiful
—timesonline.co.uk
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Human Glow
science
Imaging of Ultraweak Spontaneous Photon Emission from Human Body Displaying Diurnal Rhythm
—plosone.org
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Anti-Aging from Easter Island
science
Easter Island Compound Extends Lifespan of Old mice, Scientists Report in Nature
—San Antonio UT Health Science Center
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Life Support Coke
health
ColaLife
—mrmattspangler.com
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The Purple Bus Lady
health
Ground shifting on Rx debate
—Atlanta Journal Constitution (ajc.com)
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This Couple, 40 Years Later
culture
Woodstock Concert's Undercover Lovers, Nick and Bobbi Ercoline, 40 Years After Summer of Love
—nydailynews.com (photo by Burk Uzzle/Courtesy
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Saving Languages
culture
Linguist's Preservation Kit Has New Digital Tools
—nytimes.com, July 27, 2009
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Billboard Planters
environment
Green Sleeves
—torontoist.com, July 22, 2009
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Haiti: Decreased HIV Infection Rate
health
From Haiti, a Surprise: Good News about AIDS
—MSNBC, July 6, 2009
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A Moving Facade
art & design
Mind-blowing 3D Projection on German building Created by UrbanScreen
—freshome.com
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The Dutch Master
art & design
The Dutch Master by Core77
—core77.com, July 8, 2009
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10-30% Longer Life
science
Antibiotic Delayed Aging in Experiments With Mice
—July 08, 2009 - The New York Times
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Tooth-growing Cells
health
4 Next-Generation Medical Procedures
—July, 2009 - Popular Mechanics
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The Benefits of Catastrophe
global
How Global Catastrophe Could Make Us Smarter
—July 07, 2009 - Live Science
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Eco-Friendly Houseplants
environment
Top 10 Natural, Eco-Friendly and Anti-Pollutant Houseplants
—July 07, 2009 - The New Ecologist
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Civilization
art & design
Marco Brambilla: Civilization
—motionographer, June 28, 2009
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Hydropolis
architecture
Hydropolis Underwater Hotel, Dubai, United Arab Emirates
—design-buildnetwork.com
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Computable Civilisation
technology
An Invention That Could Change the Internet Forever
—The Independent, May 3, 2009
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How We Remember
science
Sleep Helps Build Long-Term Memories
—MIT News, June 24, 2009
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SXSW Music Clips
culture
Tune Yards - Dig For Fire's SXSW '09
—Babelgum
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Hunting Dark Matter
science
Work begins on world's deepest underground lab
—June 22nd, 2009 By DIRK LAMMERS , Associated
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35,000 Year-old Flutes
culture
'Oldest musical instrument' found
—BBC News
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Solar Shingles v.2
technology
Flexible Solar Cell Roof Shingles Unveiled
—archiCentral.com
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Breakdancing Robot Manoi
urban
MANOI GO
—Youtube
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Swedish Wisdom
art & design
Malmö win for topless Swedish bathers
—The Local: Swedish News In English
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Curiouser and Curiouser
art & design
First Photos: Tim Burton's Alice in Wonderland - What Do You Think?
—SlashFilm.com
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African Sunlight
technology
Holy Solar Funding: Project Desertec to Get $500 Billion Cash Infusion?
—solveclimate.com, June 18, 2009
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Annecy 2009
art & design
Gobelins - Annecy 2009
—YouTube.com, June 12, 2009
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Empathy in the Middle East
global
Palestinians Assist Injured Settlers
—The Jerusalem Post, June 10, 2009
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The High Line
urban
High Line Open!
—thehighline.org, June 09, 2009
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Beautiful Information
art & design
GOOD Magazine's Transparencies Archive
—Flick, June 11, 2009
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Virtual Twins
science
Virtual Twins Could Bring the End of Animal Research
—NewScientist.com, June, 03, 2009
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Art Rafts
art & design
'Swimming Cities' Art Rafts Arrive in Venice
—AnimalNewYork.com, June 3, 2009
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Spontaneity
culture
Sasquatch Music Festival 2009
—YouTube.com, May 26, 2009
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Hyalinobatrachium Pellucidum
science
South America's Wildlife Wonders
—BBC News, June, 16, 2009
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Bananas Replacing Firewood
environment
Going Bananas for Energy in Africa
—BBC, May 12, 2009
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